Balancing the Leadership Challenge.

February 11, 2010 — 46 Comments

Leadership Challenge 300x299 Balancing the Leadership Challenge.Leaders who attract quality people, know that the key is to become a person of quality themselves.  Leadership is the ability to attract someone to the gifts, skills, and opportunities you offer as a parent, as a manager, as a business owner. I’m going to go ahead and call leadership the great challenge of life.  It seems that what is important in leadership is refining your skills.  All great leaders keep working on themselves continuously until they become effective.  And once they become effective, they continue to grow in all aspects of life.

Here are some specifics that the late Jim Rohn showed us during his journey into the leadership horizon.

1) Learn to be strong but not rude. It is an extra step you must take to become a powerful, capable leader with a wide range of reach.  Some people mistake rudeness for strength. It’s not even a good substitute.

2) Learn to be kind but not weak.  We must not mistake kindness for weakness.  Kindness isn’t weak. Kindness is a certain type of strength.  We must be kind enough to tell somebody the truth.  We must be kind enough and considerate enough to lay it on the line.  We must be kind enough to tell it like it is and not deal in delusion.

3) Learn to be bold but not a bully.  It takes boldness to win the day.  To build your influence, you’ve got to walk in front of your group.  You’ve got to be willing to take the first arrow, tackle the first problem, discover the first sign of trouble.

4) You’ve got to learn to be humble, but not timid.  You can’t get to the high life by being timid.  Some people mistake timidity for humility.  Humility is almost a Godlike word.  A sense of awe…a sense of wonder.  An awareness of the human soul and spirit.  An understanding that there is something unique about the human drama versus the rest of life.  Humility is a grasp of the distance between us and the stars, yet having the feeling that we’re part of the stars.  So humility is a virtue; but timidity is a disease.  Timidity is an affliction.  It can be cured, but it is a problem.

5) Be proud but not arrogant. It takes pride to win the day.  It takes pride to build your ambition.  It takes pride in community, it takes pride in cause, in accomplishment.  But the key to becoming a good leader is being proud without being arrogant.  In fact, I believe the worst kind of arrogance is arrogance from ignorance.  It’s when you don’t know that you don’t know!  Now that kind of arrogance is intolerable.  If someone is smart and arrogant, we can tolerate that. But if someone is ignorant and arrogant, that’s just too much to take.

6) Develop humor without folly.  That’s important for a leader.  In leadership, we learn that it’s okay to be witty, but not silly.  It’s okay to be fun, but not foolish.

Lastly, deal in realities. Deal in truth.  Save yourself the agony, just accept life like it is…life is unique.  Some people call it tragic, but I’d like to think it’s unique.  The whole drama of life is unique.  It’s fascinating and I’ve found that the skills that work well for one leader may not work at all for another.  But the overall fundamental skills of leadership can be adapted to work well for just about everyone: at work, in the community, and at home.
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Geoff

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Hello, I'm Geoff Snyder. Thank you for allowing me to connect with you. A big part of this blog is to connect with readers like yourself, to share experiences with, and discuss each other's passions. Without leadership... what's next?
  • http://www.goarticles.com/cgi-bin/showa.cgi?C=2574226 Steven Missey

    Love your post. This is great information, and I’m really glad I found it. Keep up the great work.

  • http://www.goarticles.com/cgi-bin/showa.cgi?C=2574226 Steven Missey

    Love your post. This is great information, and I’m really glad I found it. Keep up the great work.

  • http://nlptraininghq.com/ Nanci Colle

    Hi – I would like to say thanks for an interesting post about leadership. I have had an interest in for a long time now. I have been looking in and reading the posts avidly so just wanted to express my gratitude for providing me with some very good reading material. I look forward to more, and taking a more active part in the discussions here, while picking up some knowledge too!!

  • http://nlptraininghq.com/ Nanci Colle

    Hi – I would like to say thanks for an interesting post about leadership. I have had an interest in for a long time now. I have been looking in and reading the posts avidly so just wanted to express my gratitude for providing me with some very good reading material. I look forward to more, and taking a more active part in the discussions here, while picking up some knowledge too!!

  • KateNasser

    Hi Geoff,
    I think this post would do well to appear in every college/university that is training tomorrow's leaders. As you quoted Jim Rohn's 6 steps to great leadership, you/Jim actually describe the challenge of living a balanced life, of personal/professional growth, and perhaps the behavior to exhibit when raising healthy creative children into adults.

    Great refreshing post and I will RT it on Twitter. I offer you the following post on developing teams with the same healthy balance:
    —————-
    http://katenasser.com/teamwork-gems-create-star

    All the best and thanks for your post.
    Kate Nasser, The People-Skills Coach

  • geoffsnyder

    Hey Kate,
    Funny you should mention the college/university training, as for I am currently scheduling several speeches within the local area at local campuses. The focus is on leadership development within our local communities for students that have approached their “fork in the road” when it comes to joining the workforce or pursuing their path of higher education. Amazingly, the areas that you mentioned above, such as balance life based on conceptual platforms and personal and professional development are outlined in detail.

    Thank you again for the insight and the link. I'm looking forward to reading the post and collaborating further with you on it.

    Keep doing great things.
    Geoff