3 Things I’m Doing to Improve My Platform

improved platformToday’s busy social space sometimes creates quite a challenge to filter out a lot of the noise. With so many “new” social media tools and app integrations, it would seem impossible for anybody new to the arena to gain ground.

Very recently, I was asked “Geoff, what are you doing to improve your platform?” This made me stop and think. Here is what I came up with:

Stay Proactive With Inquiries
Nobody like’s talking to a wall. When we reach out to somebody with a question or comment on one’s blog or Facebook page, we usually think others will respond. At the least, the person whose thread we area commenting in. I make it an effort to reply to every e-mail, blog comment, Facebook comment, tweet… etc. I’ve worked hard to position myself within focused marketplaces and still allow for my personal life to have its responsible presence. Because let’s face it… all business really is personal. The friendships accumulated along the journey.

Expanding Mediums
Anything I’ve signed up for in the years past, I’ve looked at closely to see how I can leverage it to help my position/brand. I also wanted to learn how it can help others accomplish what they want. If I can share with others what I’ve learned, and it helps them… my efforts have been worth it.

Maybe it’s because I work in tech that a lot of these things come easy to me. But I cannot express how many times I’ve seen others just start buying domains, hosting, themes, plugins, software, apps… etc, based on… nothing. Earlier this year, I was involved with someone very intelligent who bought up all kinds of stuff for their launch idea and clearly had no idea what they were doing. When it was brought up in conversation, their response was just that, “Well, I don’t know. I don’t know anything about this. I spent a bunch of money on all this. How was I supposed to know?” I was appalled when I heard this coming from someone who strongly advocates “Use Your Resources!” So, take your time and ask people who you know who have been down the road before. Otherwise, you’re just creating unnecessary work for yourself and others involved.

Again… take time to use your resources. You’ll find that the hidden community involved with content management, personal branding and positioning, and social media is filled with all kinds of great people!

Separating Personal and Professional Branding
This is somewhat of a new avenue for me. Several years ago when I decided to create my online presence by jumping from the “I’m a fly” approach, to the “I am the honey” direction, I learned that people wanted to know about me. They wanted to know a little about what makes me get up in the morning, opposed to just what I’ve done and what I’m doing during my day. Professionally. We want to learn about each other. I think this is just human nature. I always enjoy connecting with somebody and then learn what I can about them through their social media streams. And then when it comes time for me to meet them, the level of accuracy (or lack there of) is always rewarding. It helps me realize that my perception and interpretation skills are honed well.

So, creating a personal and professional avenue for both entities helps allow marketability. I believe if it’s done right, they can both help each other and greater results will occur. I’m sure I’ll be following up with this later. So, that’s it for now. I’ll leave this post by asking you this simple question:

What are you currently doing to enhance your online presence and how is it helping you daily?

5 Tips for Enhancing Team Morale in the Workplace

team morale workplaceIf you are responsible for managing a group of employees, then you should understand how important the concept of teamwork is in the workplace. Not only will it make your job easier, but it will also improve your productivity, your effectiveness as a manager, and your reputation amongst those above you. There are some very simple things you can do to promote positive, cooperative contributions from your employees. Follow these five tips for encouraging team spirit in the workplace:

Establish clearly-defined goals, guidelines, and tasks. If you want your employees to take responsibility for their roles on the team, then you need to make sure they know exactly what it is that they are supposed to be doing. Make it a point to clearly describe every aspect of the project at hand, as well as what you expect from each of the team members.

Delegate, rather than micromanage. Part of having team spirit is acting autonomously toward the team’s goal. When you micromanage, you undermine a person’s ability to be autonomous. It is not only dehumanizing, but also a surefire way to suck the enthusiasm right out of the workplace. Delegate responsibilities to your employees, making sure to be very clear about what you need each one to accomplish, and to what standards, and then allow them to find their personal methods for working most constructively. Whenever employees know they are responsible for the outcome of their work, they are less likely to pass the responsibility or the blame on to a coworker and more likely to find ways to work together and support each other.

Provide employees with the tools they need to be successful. Prepare employees for a job well done by providing the education, mentoring, resources, tools and support they need. This makes them feel valuable and boosts morale, which promotes teamwork.

Communicate with the team on a regular basis. Have team meetings as needed so that employees can express to you any questions, concerns, or suggestions they might have, and so that you can provide them with useful feedback and encouragement.

Offer team incentives. Once you establish the guidelines for a new project, offer the team a reward for timely, quality completion. The reward could be a paid lunch out, a company party, or a paycheck bonus. Give employees a few options and let them decide together, as a team, which incentive they prefer.

Write Your Own Prescription For Health And Happiness

prescription for happinessHave you ever said to yourself “I wish THEY made a pill for that?” If so, you’re not alone. In fact, you’re on board with about 95% of the population. But, the fact of the matter is that “the pill” has always been there, right in front of you the entire time.

I am convinced that 95% of all health problems and “need” for medication stem from lack of nutritional upkeep via healthy diet, proper sleeping habits, and exercise. But here is the kicker… each one of these depends on the other. You can eat like the biggest health nut on the planet, but if you’re not getting enough exercise and/or sleep, it’s not going to have the same effect as if it was balanced by the others.

“You are the sum of what you consume. Be careful what you feed yourself with; physically and mentally.”

I’m amazed at the number of people who are convinced that what they hear on the radio and see on their TVs is 100% accurate. I haven’t owned a TV for over 10 years and since I’ve moved to Phoenix, which was almost two years ago, I’ve yet to turn my radio on.

The amount of “noise” is sickening. I think it was Donald Trump who said: “I’d rather not be informed at all than to be misinformed.” Think of all the people you know who base their life on “other’s” lifestyle. Or worse yet, watching them to continuously watch Hollywood fed fairy tales and expect for their friends and family to follow suit. Sure, it’s an industry and a business but it’s not a healthy one. We all have the same amount of time, so consider how much of it you spend reading or watching about “bath salts” and “child abductions” or “political spin doctors.” Consider allotting that time reading a good book about world history, or the amazing wonders of insulin and how our bodies function properly. Or perhaps spend some time at a local community center or church. Better yet, spend the time with the people that you love, whether it’s in person, on the phone, or via video conference.

When you find yourself being unhappy with yourself, that’s the perfect time to love those who mean the most to you even more.

Decision Modes

decision makingJames Archer of Forty Agency released an excellent example of what takes place during a decision making process. He breaks it down into four different categories. They are:

Spontaneous

Fast and Emotional decision making often referred to as Choleric. Spontaneous decision makers like it when they see themselves. When they see something as “quick and easy”, they encourage themselves to act upon and move forward.

Competitive

Fast and Logical decision making often referred to as Melancholic. Competitive decision makers like to be given credentials and proof. Explaining the uniqueness of the product or service (much like Al Ries and Jack Trout refer to in their book “Positioning”) and showing “The Best” and/or “The Only”, is what attracts this group of decision makers.

Humanistic

Slow and Emotional decision making often referred to as Sanguine. Humanistic decision makers like it when a sensory experience is created for them. They seek a story told based on emotion.

Methodical

Slow and Logical decision making often referred to as Phlegmatic. The methodical decision makes like the process explained to them, so providing them with details and examples allows them to dig in and decide accordingly.

I’d like to thank James Archer of The Forty Agency for doing the research and providing the content used in this post. If you’d like to read up and learn more about the four personality types listed in this post, I recommend reading “Positive Personality Profiles” by my dear friend Robert A. Rohm Ph.D..

Brain Trust

brain trustWhat is Brain Trust? When do we recognize an empathic trigger for decision making? Is there a thought process that takes place to make this happen? Or do we go with our gut feeling?

To neurophilosophy pioneer, Patricia Churchland, Brain Trust argues that:

“Morality originates in the biology of the brain. She describes the “neurobiological platform of bonding” that, modified by evolutionary pressures and cultural values, has led to human styles of moral behavior.”

I’m going to touch on a couple of areas that I feel to be key points in which allow us to make decisions. All three comparisons are very similar but each unique to their own.

Intuition vs. Intellect

Intuition is defined as the ability to acquire knowledge without inference or the use of reason. This is a feeling in which we will posses for a very short period of time. A period of time that will either make or break the outcome based on our action(s). Most people I’ve discussed this with tend to refer to their “gut feeling” when we discuss this. A feeling. A heartfelt feeling that comes from the inside. Something personal and real. Most who are aligned with this often refer to a divinely guided source; faith based and often a very spiritual “pointer” or “marker” allowing them to come to a conclusion.

Intellect is often defined as the power of knowing as distinguished from the power to feel and to will: the capacity for knowledge. Now, I can’t say that I completely agree with this, as I’ve always been under the impression that it’s a matter of one’s capacity of knowledge (facts) but not necessarily anything to do with actual wisdom or what’s more commonly referred to as “common sense”. This kind of compares to what I recently posted about my “IF, THEN, and GOTO” philosophy. The use of intellect when making decision

Emotion vs Logic

I think most of us know the bodily feelings we get when emotion kicks in and I’m convinced that it’s the primary force in which guides us. And if not, it needs to be. More often than not, I see people over-think and over-analyze a situation (God know’s I’ve done this… a lot!) and create a very complex (and often busy, inaccurate) decision based on knowledge and noise they’ve gathered over the years. This is often self-sabotaging and damaging to others involved. We’re creatures of the heart and possess a certain amount of morality. I believe this to be something very personal and very natural for all of us and think we need to embrace it more than any other attribute assigned to us.

As far as logic is concerned, I believe this to have one place and one place only: To make a decision based on black and white. If there is something proven in an area that is not influenced by human opinion and has a solid basis, something proven in the area of science, then by all means… use it. Working extensively with technical professionals, and very recently being involved in an intimate relationship with a scientist, I’ve noticed one thing in common. Whether we want to admit or not, we all think we have a profound answer to all situations. Whether it’s something we’ve stored in our own little God-given storage banks or a reference we have access to. We believe we have all the answers and overlook one small detail: Emotion; one thing that has no predictability.

Do you think decision making is a methodological or humanistic approach?