Yousea

yousea unicorn brieanna

yousea
/yo͞o sē/
pronoun
pronoun: yousea
  1. 1.
    the phonetic pronunciation of the assigned acronym for the word: unicorn
    “can you believe that yousea actually exists?”
    • used to refer to the person being addressed as a reminder how one of a kind they are.
    • used in exclamations to address one or more amazing qualities.
      “did you ever dream of discovering a real life yousea?”
  2. 2.
    a word created during the first Mercury in Retrograde of 2018, with April 15th, 2018 being the official go-live date.
    “yousea, this is for you. may history continue to write our story. i love you.”
    Origin:
    Old English ēow, accusative, and dative of  (see uc1); related to Dutch u and German euch . During the 21tst century yousea began to replace unicorn1, uc1, and yousee; by the 22nd century, the hope to see it fully adopted is intact.

2, 4, 6, 8; Time To Recalibrate!

leadership planThe other day I received an e-mail notification that my domain name for this blog is up for renewal. This triggered me to go back and review my blog postings and perform a quick personal inventory. While I was reading over each of my previous posts, it reminded me why I began blogging and what my short and long-term goals were. Being completely honest, I had no idea what I was getting myself into and what the future had in store. Here is a short list of phases and their descriptions I encountered along the way:

  1. Establish the basics and define the overall navigation around WordPress and find ways to define core values, identity, and overall content.
  2. Create an identity for the blogosphere to answer the following question: “Who is Geoff Snyder?“
  3. Learn about theme layouts, plugins, basic SEO, linking, and VERY basic HTML and PHP coding.
  4. Understand proper social media etiquette and sincere engagement, while also learning how to automate.
  5. Discover the importance of RSS feeds and their subscribers.

Staying true to the core values and beliefs while collaborating with other like-minded individuals.
Research, read, discuss, read some more, collaborate, and most importantly…stay proactive!
Now that I think I have the swing of things and have been lurking around the blogosphere, I’ve decided to add some personality…make this something personal, find ways to materialize what I’ve gathered into something meaningful, opposed to writing robotic “content friendly” posts simply to appease the search engines’ crawlers.

With that said, I must express my deep, sincere gratitude for the wonderful people I’ve encountered along the way. The level of friendly engagement has made me realize the power of blogging, the world of social media (twitter, facebook, linkedin, etc…), and how social networking has the ability to bring together so many people that we never knew existed. The level of synergy that is available to us is extremely powerful. With the tools of a laptop, an internet connection, the motivation to seek like-minded people, as well as the passion to help others achieve their goals, I am convinced that there is absolutely nothing that cannot be achieved.

Now, I know that the last sentence of the previous paragraph may have some overtones of the cliche our parents told us for all those years: “You can do anything that you put your mind to.” Well, it’s true and the efforts and their results far outweigh the consequences of living in fear or sustaining a lack of confidence. I know, I’ve been there a few times throughout my short life and I am so thankful for those who’ve been there to help pick me back up and support me during those dark times.

I’m going to go ahead and wrap this post up with a couple words: Dream Big.

Call me “Juno” if you will, call me a post-modernist, or call me some new age yuppie type…but we’re in the 21st century and the rules have changed. Globally, as Robert Dickie recently tweeted: “We did not just go through a “recession” we went through a “reset.” This is important to understand. Many of the rules have changed.” It’s time to throw away the status-quo and begin leading from within. It will allow for a reflection so bright that it will glow amongst all of those close to you and those you’re about to meet along the way.

I’d like to thank Tom Schulte for the inspiration of the title and thought of this blog post. Thank you, Tom.

Recent Department of Labor Statistics

statisticsOn the last business day of August, the number of job openings in the U.S. was little changed at a series low level of 2.4 million, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. The hires rate was little changed and remained low at 3.1 percent in August. The total separations rate was little changed and remained low at 3.3 percent. This release includes estimates of the number and rate of job openings, hires, and separations for the total nonfarm sector by industry and geographic region.

Job Openings

The job openings rate was unchanged in August at a rate of 1.8
percent. The number of job openings has fallen by 2.4 million, or 50
percent, since the most recent peak in June 2007. The job openings
rate was little changed in August in all industries and regions.

Over the 12 months ending in August, the job openings rate (not
seasonally adjusted) decreased for total non-private,
government, the majority of industries, and all four regions. The rate
was little changed in construction; wholesale trade; real estate and
rental and leasing; educational services; and other services.

Hires

The hires level was little changed at 4.0 million in August but has
declined by 1.6 million, or 28 percent, since the most recent peak in
July 2006. The hires rate was low in August at 3.1 percent and little
changed from July. The hires rate was little changed in August in all
industries. The hires rate decreased over the month in the West and
was little changed in the remaining regions.

Over the 12 months ending in August, the hires rate (not seasonally
adjusted) declined for total nonfarm, total private, and government.
The hires rate decreased for mining and logging; construction; retail
trade; finance and insurance; educational services; and state and
local government. The hires rate fell over the past 12 months in the
West and was little changed in the remaining regions.

Separations

The total separations, or turnover, rate was little changed in August
and remained low at 3.3 percent. The total separations rate (not
seasonally adjusted) decreased over the 12 months ending in August for
total nonfarm and total private. Total separations includes quits
(voluntary separations), layoffs and discharges (involuntary
separations), and other separations (including retirements).

The quits rate can serve as a measure of workers’ willingness or
ability to change jobs. The rate was little changed in August at 1.3
percent. The quits level was 1.7 million in August, which is 45
percent lower than the most recent peak in December 2006.

Over the 12 months ending in August, the quits rate (not seasonally
adjusted) was lower for total nonfarm, total private, government, the
majority of industries, and all four regions. The industries for which
the quits rate was little changed over the year include
transportation, warehousing, and utilities; information; finance and
insurance; real estate and rental and leasing; arts, entertainment and
recreation; and federal government.

The layoffs and discharges component of total separations is
seasonally adjusted at the total nonfarm, total private, and
government levels. The layoffs and discharges level for total nonfarm,
total private, and government was little changed in August at 2.3
million, 2.2 million, and 135,000 respectively. The corresponding
layoffs and discharges rates were 1.8 percent, 2.0 percent, and 0.6
percent. The number of layoffs and discharges in August was 46 percent
higher than the recent low point in January 2006.

The layoffs and discharges rate (not seasonally adjusted) was little
changed over the 12 months ending in August for total nonfarm and
total private and increased for government. The layoffs and discharges
rate rose in mining and logging; construction; nondurable goods
manufacturing; and state and local government. The layoffs and
discharges rate increased in the Midwest and was little changed in the
remaining regions.

The other separations series is not seasonally adjusted. In August,
there were 321,000 other separations for total nonfarm, 263,000 for
total private, and 58,000 for government. Compared to August 2008, the
number of other separations was little changed for total nonfarm,
total private, and government.

The total separations level is influenced by the relative contribution
of its three components—quits, layoffs and discharges, and other
separations. The percentage of total separations at the total nonfarm
level attributable to the individual components has varied over time.
The proportion of separations due to quits declined from 61 percent in
January 2007 to a series low of 38 percent in April 2009. It then rose
slightly and stood at 41 percent in August 2009. The proportion of
layoffs and discharges reached a series high of 55 percent in July
2009 then dropped slightly to 54 percent in August 2009.

Net Change in Employment

Over the 12 months ending in August, hires totaled 50.9 million and
separations totaled 56.1 million, yielding a net employment loss of
5.2 million.